Fahrenheit 9/11 premiers

Michael Moore’s new movie, Fahrenheit 9/11, premiered last night in Manhattan. Here’s one review of the film that caught my eye:

But once “F9/11” gets to audiences beyond screenings, it won’t be dependent on celebrities for approbation. It turns out to be a really brilliant piece of work, and a film that members of all political parties should see without fail.

As much as some might try to marginalize this film as a screed against President George Bush, “F9/11”—as we saw last night—is a tribute to patriotism, to the American sense of duty, and at the same time a indictment of stupidity and avarice. Readers of this column may recall that I had a lot of problems with Moore’s “Bowling for Columbine,” particularly where I thought he took gratuitous shots at helpless targets like Charlton Heston. “Columbine” too easily succeeded by shooting fish in a barrel, as they used to say. Not so with “F9/11,” which instead relies on lots of film footage and actual interviews to make its case against the war in Iraq and tell the story of the intertwining histories of the Bush and Bin Laden families.

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But, really, in the end, not seeing “F9/11” would be like allowing your first amendment rights to be abrogated, no matter whether you’re a Republican or a Democrat. The film does Bush no favors, that’s for sure, but it also finds an unexpectedly poignant and universal groove in the story of Lila Lipscombe, a Flint, Michigan mother who sends her kids into the Army for the opportunities it can provide—just like the commercials say—and lives to regret it. Lipscombe’s story is so powerful, and so completely Middle American, that I think it will take Moore’s critics by surprise. She will certainly move to tears everyone who encounters her.

Here’s the kicker: the reviewer is Roger Friedman of — wait for it — Fox News.